Population, Ageing and Retirement

Western Australia’s population is projected to more than double to over 5 million by 2050. Most of this growth is projected to occur in Perth, with the regional areas recording a smaller growth. The population is also ageing, with median ages rising and life expectancies increasing. The Baby Boomer cohort – born during the post World War II fertility boom – is streaming into retirement and entering old age. This research theme explores how changing population dynamics will affect all aspects of life in the WA and Australian community. These include the impacts of population growth and ageing on economic and social participation, quality of life, health and care needs, housing needs, financial security, and mobility within and across states and territories. Projects and publications under this theme produce evidence-based analysis to inform policies that aim to harness the opportunities and address the challenges brought on by changing demographic trends in WA and nationally.

Related Publications

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Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Housing Supply Rachel Ong ViforJ, Christopher Phelps, Steven Rowley, Gavin Wood This paper provides an analysis of spatial and temporal patterns in housing supply in Australia over the period 2005–06 to 2015–16. It shows that by international standards, per capita housing supply is very strong in Australia. However, housing supply is... Read article 28 September 2017Journal Articles Read More
Housing Futures in Australia: An Intergenerational Perspective Rachel Ong ViforJ This presentation was delivered by Professor Rachel Ong ViforJ at the launch of CEDA’s Housing Australia research report, on 29 August 2017 in Perth. As a contributing author for the report, Rachel’s presentation centered on her chapter titled Intergenerational Consequences. 29 August 2017Presentations Read More
The Impact of Maternal Mental Health Shocks on Child Health: Ha Nguyen, Huong Thu Le This paper contributes to an emerging body of literature on intergenerational transmission in health by presenting the causal estimates on the impact of maternal mental health shocks on child health. The potential endogeneity of maternal mental health shocks is dealt... Read article 23 August 2017Journal Articles Read More
Out of sight but not out of mind: Home countries’ macroeconomic volatilities and immigrants’ mental health Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly We provide the first empirical evidence that better economic performances by immigrants’ countries of origin, as measured by lower CPI or higher GDP, improve immigrants’ mental health. We use an econometrically-robust approach that exploits exogenous changes in macroeconomic conditions across... Read article 15 June 2017Journal Articles Read More
The Australian housing system: a quiet revolution? Rachel Ong ViforJ, Gavin Wood The Australian housing system is quietly undergoing a major transformation. Many young and middle-aged home owners are paying down large mortgages that leave them precariously positioned on the margins of ownership. As house prices have remained stubbornly high relative to... Read article 1 June 2017 Read More
The dynamics of informal care provision in the Australian household panel survey: Previous work characteristics and future care provision Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly This study contributes to a small literature on the dynamics of informal care by examining the informal care provision choices of working age Australians. We focus on the impact of previous work characteristics (including work security and flexibility) on subsequent... Read article 20 April 2017Journal Articles Read More