Population, Ageing and Retirement

Western Australia’s population is projected to more than double to over 5 million by 2050. Most of this growth is projected to occur in Perth, with the regional areas recording a smaller growth. The population is also ageing, with median ages rising and life expectancies increasing. The Baby Boomer cohort – born during the post World War II fertility boom – is streaming into retirement and entering old age.  This research theme explores how changing population dynamics will affect all aspects of life in the WA and Australian community. These include the impacts of population growth and ageing on economic and social participation, quality of life, health and care needs, housing needs, financial security, and mobility within and across States and Territories. Projects and publications under this theme produce evidence-based analysis to inform policies that aim to harness the opportunities and address the challenges brought on by changing demographic trends in WA and nationally.

Related Publications

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Out of sight but not out of mind: Home countries’ macroeconomic volatilities and immigrants’ mental health Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly We provide the first empirical evidence that better economic performances by immigrants’ countries of origin, as measured by lower CPI or higher GDP, improve immigrants’ mental health. We use an econometrically-robust approach that exploits exogenous changes in macroeconomic conditions across... Read article 15 June 2017Journal Articles Read More
The dynamics of informal care provision in the Australian household panel survey: Previous work characteristics and future care provision Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly This study contributes to a small literature on the dynamics of informal care by examining the informal care provision choices of working age Australians. We focus on the impact of previous work characteristics (including work security and flexibility) on subsequent... Read article 20 April 2017Journal Articles Read More
Life on the edge: a perspective on precarious home ownership in Australia and the UK Gavin Wood, Susan J. Smith, Melek Cigdem, Rachel Ong This paper focuses on two countries with debt-funded ownership-centred housing systems, Australia and the UK. Financially, there are similarities between these two societies, which have relatively ‘complete’, reasonably well-regulated mortgage markets, had limited exposure to the extremes of subprime, and... Read article 1 April 2017Journal Articles Read More
Housing equity withdrawal: perceptions of obstacles among Australian home owners and service providers Rachel Ong, Siobhan Austen, Therese Jefferson, Marietta Haffner, Gavin Wood Housing wealth dominates the asset portfolios of the older population in Australia and many other countries. Given the anticipated spike in fiscal costs associated with population ageing, there is growing policy interest in housing equity withdrawal (HEW) to finance living... Read article 20 February 2017Journal Articles Read More
The edges of home ownership – the borders of sustainability Marietta Haffner, Rachel Ong, Susan J. Smith, Gavin Wood In many Western countries the edges of ownership form a neglected zone between the majority tenure, sustainable owner-occupation, and the minority experience, long-term renting. In these tenure-divided societies, it is surprising that so little attention has been paid to the... Read article 1 January 2017Journal Articles Read More
Gendered Ageism in Australia: Changing Perceptions of Age Discrimination among Older Men and Women Michael McGann, Rachel Ong, Dina Bowman, Alan Duncan, Helen Kimberley, Simon Biggs This paper investigates how age and gender interact to shape older jobseekers’ experiences of age discrimination within a mixed methods framework. The analysis reveals that there has been a considerable decline in national levels of perceived ageism generally among older... Read article 1 December 2016Journal Articles Read More