Policy Evaluation

BCEC plays an active role in policy forecasting and evaluation. A range of applied economic methods are used to evaluate the content, implementation and impact of current and proposed policies across Australia. Evaluation findings can highlight ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ in the population under proposed and existing policy reforms, as well as the overall budgetary implications of proposed reforms at both Federal and State levels.

The findings from the Centre’s evaluations is intended to inform decision-making by policymakers in regard to the benefits and trade-offs of proposed policy changes. Examples of evaluations on current and proposed programs that the Centre’s researchers have conducted include the NSW government’s ‘Keep Them Safe’ child protection initiative, the national Headspace program providing early intervention mental health services to young people, and a range of housing-related policies and programs such as changes to the First Home Owner’s Grant, stamp duty and land tax provisions, and public housing rent-setting rules.

Related Publications

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Child poverty: Prevalence and progress Alan Duncan This presentation was delivered by Professor Alan Duncan at the Western Australian Council of Social Service (WACOSS) Community Relief and Resilience Conference, on 26 July 2017 in Perth. The conference centred on the theme of child poverty, 30 years after then... Read article 26 July 2017Presentations Read More
Educate Australia Fair? Rebecca Cassells, Michael Dockery, Alan Duncan, Grace Gao, Richard Seymour When we think of a ‘good society’ – a society that is fair and just – one of the defining characteristics is likely to be that all individuals have equal opportunity to realise their potential, irrespective of the circumstances into... Read article 28 June 2017Focus on The States Read More
Inquiry into housing policies, labour force participation and economic growth Rachel Ong ViforJ, Gavin Wood, Stephen Whelan, Melek Cigdem, Kadir Atalay, Jago Dodson This Inquiry presents evidence on how housing policies might promote labour force participation and economic growth through four channels—housing supply responsiveness, labour mobility, employment decisions and consumption. Despite strong evidence of housing’s large presence in the economy, it is often... Read article 27 June 2017Research Reports Read More
The Australian housing system: a quiet revolution? Rachel Ong ViforJ, Gavin Wood The Australian housing system is quietly undergoing a major transformation. Many young and middle-aged home owners are paying down large mortgages that leave them precariously positioned on the margins of ownership. As house prices have remained stubbornly high relative to... Read article 1 June 2017 Read More
Life on the edge: a perspective on precarious home ownership in Australia and the UK Gavin Wood, Susan J. Smith, Melek Cigdem, Rachel Ong ViforJ This paper focuses on two countries with debt-funded ownership-centred housing systems, Australia and the UK. Financially, there are similarities between these two societies, which have relatively ‘complete’, reasonably well-regulated mortgage markets, had limited exposure to the extremes of subprime, and... Read article 1 April 2017Journal Articles Read More
Aboriginal assets? The impact of major agreements associated with native title in Western Australia Michael Dockery, Sarah Prout, Aileen Hoath Agreements negotiated under the regime created by the Native Title Act (1993) are often seen as having the potential to address disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and promote Aboriginal economic independence. This applies particularly to regional... Read article 20 March 2017Research Reports Read More