Income and Wealth

Economic analysis of income and wealth accumulation and divestment traditionally draws on the life cycle hypothesis, which suggests that earlier life stages are spent accumulating wealth while accumulated wealth is drawn down to meet spending needs in old age. This research theme explores a range of issues related to income and wealth in WA and Australia including the distribution and composition of income and wealth, economic inequality over the life course, income poverty measurement and the impacts of family income and wealth on wellbeing.

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Gender Equity Insights 2017: Inside Australia’s Gender Pay Gap Rebecca Cassells, Alan Duncan, Rachel Ong The persistence of the gender pay gap in the Australian labour market is perplexing. The past decades have seen some major advances for women in the workforce and intentional policy initiatives that have targeted a reduction of the pay gap... Read article 2 March 2017Gender Equity Insights Read More
Cost-sharing in health insurance and its impact in a developing country– Evidence from a quasi-natural experiment Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly Though the impact of cost-sharing on health care demand is well documented in developed countries, evidence from developing countries is rare. This paper’s contribution is to analyse the impact of increasing coinsurance in a developing nation -Vietnam – by exploiting... Read article 1 February 2017Working Papers Read More
Wellbeing at the edges of ownership Susan J. Smith, Melek Cigdem, Rachel Ong, Gavin Wood The test of a well-functioning housing system is the wellbeing of its occupants. It may therefore seem encouraging that in jurisdictions dominated by mortgage-backed home ownership, owner-occupiers traditionally report better physical and mental health than renters. During the 2000s, however,... Read article 23 January 2017Journal Articles Read More
The impact of differentiated access to income and wealth on health and wellbeing outcomes: a longitudinal Australian study Garth Kendall, Ha Nguyen, Rachel Ong It is very likely that differential access to income and accumulated wealth are both mechanisms that promote growing inequalities between individuals and families in Australia. If this proposition is true, it is important to know the extent to which this... Read article 1 January 2017Working Papers Read More
The dynamics of informal care provision in an Australian household panel survey: Previous work characteristics and future care provision Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly This study contributes to a small literature on the dynamics of informal care by examining the informal care provision choices of working age Australians. We focus on the impact of previous work characteristics (including work security and flexibility) on subsequent... Read article 1 December 2016Working Papers Read More
Back to the future: Western Australia’s economic future after the boom Alan Duncan, Grace Gao, Ha Nguyen, Rachel Ong, Yashar Tarverdi In 2014 the first report in the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre’s Focus on Western Australia series highlighted the abnormally high growth rate enjoyed by the state in the early years of the new millennium. This extended period of economic growth was driven primarily... Read article 20 October 2016Focus on WA Read More