Health, Wellbeing and Disadvantage

While standards of living are at a historical high, significant diversity exists within the population, as individuals are exposed to different opportunities and experiences over the life course.  This research theme is broadly divided into three strands. The first aims to develop and refine measures of wellbeing and economic opportunity in Australia. The second strand focuses on barriers to economic participation by disadvantaged subgroups and how their access to economic opportunities might be improved. Subgroups of interest include people living in poverty, sole parents, long-term older renters, the unemployed, and people with disabilities. The third strand looks more broadly at the links between health and wellbeing and economic or social participation. For instance, how do health conditions affect future economic and social outcomes? What role do working conditions (e.g. flexible working practices) play in driving life satisfaction? What are the employment outcomes of people with caring responsibilities?

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Parental expectations for young people’s participation in higher education in Australia Michael Dockery, Richard Seymour, Paul Koshy This paper examines factors affecting parental expectations of higher education prospects for their children using Australian household survey data. We find that a variety of factors influence parental expectations, of which parents’ assessment of their children’s academic performance is the... Read article 14 August 2017Journal Articles Read More
Child poverty: Prevalence and progress Alan Duncan This presentation was delivered by Professor Alan Duncan at the Western Australian Council of Social Service (WACOSS) Community Relief and Resilience Conference, on 26 July 2017 in Perth. The conference centred on the theme of child poverty, 30 years after then... Read article 26 July 2017Presentations Read More
Out of sight but not out of mind: Home countries’ macroeconomic volatilities and immigrants’ mental health Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly We provide the first empirical evidence that better economic performances by immigrants’ countries of origin, as measured by lower CPI or higher GDP, improve immigrants’ mental health. We use an econometrically-robust approach that exploits exogenous changes in macroeconomic conditions across... Read article 15 June 2017Journal Articles Read More
Employers’ perception of the costs and the benefits of hiring individuals with autism spectrum disorder in open employment in Australia Melissa Scott, Andrew Jacob, Delia Hendrie, Richard Parsons, Sonya Girdler, Torbjorn Falkmer, Marita Falkmer Research has examined the benefits and costs of employing adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the perspective of the employee, taxpayer and society, but few studies have considered the employer perspective. This study examines the benefits and costs of employing adults with... Read article 18 May 2017 Read More
The dynamics of informal care provision in the Australian household panel survey: Previous work characteristics and future care provision Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly This study contributes to a small literature on the dynamics of informal care by examining the informal care provision choices of working age Australians. We focus on the impact of previous work characteristics (including work security and flexibility) on subsequent... Read article 20 April 2017Journal Articles Read More
happy workers: How satisfied are Australians at work? Rebecca Cassells In 2017, around 12 million Australians will work an estimated total of 20 billion hours in paid employment. An average Australian man can expect to spend half of their waking lives at a paying job and an average Australian woman... Read article 5 April 2017Research Reports Read More