Health, Wellbeing and Disadvantage

While standards of living are at a historical high, significant diversity exists within the population, as individuals are exposed to different opportunities and experiences over the life course.  This research theme is broadly divided into three strands. The first aims to develop and refine measures of wellbeing and economic opportunity in Australia. For instance, what are culturally appropriate measures of wellbeing and economic opportunity for Indigenous groups? The second strand focuses on barriers to economic participation by disadvantaged subgroups and how their access to economic opportunities might be improved. Subgroups of interest include people living in poverty, sole parents, long-term older renters, the unemployed, and people with disabilities. The third strand looks more broadly at the links between health and wellbeing and economic or social participation. For instance, how do health conditions affect future economic and social outcomes? What role do working conditions (e.g. flexible working practices) play in driving life satisfaction? What are the employment outcomes of people with caring responsibilities?

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Out of sight but not out of mind: Home countries’ macroeconomic volatilities and immigrants’ mental health Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly We provide the first empirical evidence that better economic performances by immigrants’ countries of origin, as measured by lower CPI or higher GDP, improve immigrants’ mental health. We use an econometrically-robust approach that exploits exogenous changes in macroeconomic conditions across... Read article 15 June 2017Journal Articles Read More
The dynamics of informal care provision in the Australian household panel survey: Previous work characteristics and future care provision Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly This study contributes to a small literature on the dynamics of informal care by examining the informal care provision choices of working age Australians. We focus on the impact of previous work characteristics (including work security and flexibility) on subsequent... Read article 20 April 2017Journal Articles Read More
happy workers: How satisfied are Australians at work? Rebecca Cassells In 2017, around 12 million Australians will work an estimated total of 20 billion hours in paid employment. An average Australian man can expect to spend half of their waking lives at a paying job and an average Australian woman... Read article 5 April 2017Research Reports Read More
Aboriginal assets? The impact of major agreements associated with native title in Western Australia Michael Dockery, Sarah Prout, Aileen Hoath Agreements negotiated under the regime created by the Native Title Act (1993) are often seen as having the potential to address disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and promote Aboriginal economic independence. This applies particularly to regional... Read article 20 March 2017Research Reports Read More
Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development Ha Nguyen, Huong Thu Le This paper examines the effects of parental health on cognitive and non-cognitive development in Australian children. The underlying nationally representative panel data and a child fixed effects estimator are used to deal with unobserved heterogeneity. We find that only father’s... Read article 27 February 2017Journal Articles Read More
Cost-sharing in health insurance and its impact in a developing country– Evidence from a quasi-natural experiment Ha Nguyen, Luke B. Connelly Though the impact of cost-sharing on health care demand is well documented in developed countries, evidence from developing countries is rare. This paper’s contribution is to analyse the impact of increasing coinsurance in a developing nation -Vietnam – by exploiting... Read article 1 February 2017Working Papers Read More